Sources - Classroom Flip

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The following sources were key sources in the development of the "Classroom Flip" model:
Baker, J. W. (2000). The "Classroom Flip": Using Web course management tools to become the guide by the side. In J. A. Chambers (Ed.), Selected Papers from the 11th International Conference on College Teaching and Learning (pp. 9-17).  Jacksonville, FL: Florida Community College at Jacksonville.

Boyer, E. L. (1990). Scholarship reconsidered: Priorities of the professoriate. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

Caine, R N. & Caine, G. (1994). Making connections: Teaching and the human brain. Menlo Park, CA: AddisonWesley Publishing Company.

Chickering, A. W., & Ehrmann, S. C. (1996).  Implementing the seven principles: Technology as a lever. AAHE Bulletin, 49 (2), 3-6.

Chickering, A. W. & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, 39(7), 3-7.

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1999).  Development and adaptations of the seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education.  New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 80, 75-81.

Johnson, D. W., Johnson, R. T., & Smith, K. A. (1998). Active learning: Cooperation in the college classroomEdina, MN: Interaction Book Company.

Roblyer, M.D.; Edwards, J. & Havriluk, M.A. (1997).  Integrating educational technology into teaching.  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.  [Note: This book is currently in its 6th edition (2013).]

Turoff, M. (2000, February). An end to student segregation: No more separation between distance learning and regular courses. On the Horizon8(1) [Online.]  
Available http://horizon.unc.edu/horizon/online/html/8/1/ (Accessed February 16, 2000).
 
The following are additional references from the “Classroom Flip” curriculum modules:
Berge, Z. (1997). Computer conferencing and the on-line classroom. International Journal of Educational Telecommunications, 3 (1), 3-21.

Black, P. & William, D. (1998, March). Assessment and classroom learning. Assessment in Education, pp. 7-74.

Bloom, B.S. (1968/70). Learning for Mastery. (UCLA-CSEIP) The evaluation comment, 1 (2), Reprinted in J.H. Block (Ed.) Mastery Learning (pp. 47-63). New York: Holt Rinehart and Wilson.

Brown, I. (1991). To learn is to teach is to create the final exam. College Teaching, 39 (4), 150-153.

Cashin, W. E. & McKnight, P. C. (1989). “Improving discussions.” In R. A. Neff & M. Weimer (Eds.), Classroom communication: Collected readings for effective discussion and questioning (pp. 33-40).  Madison, WI: Magna Publications, Inc.

Cummings, J. A. (1998).  Promoting Student Interaction in the Virtual College Classroom.  Available http://www.ihets.org/learntech/distance_ed/fdpapers/1998/52.html. (22 para.)  Accessed May 9, 2000.

Dempsey, J. V., Driscoll, M., & Swindell, L. (1993). Text-based feedback. In J. V. Dempsey & G. C. Sales (Eds.), Interactive Instruction and Feedback (pp. 21-54). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Educational Technology Publications.

Dochy, F. & McDowell, L. (1997). Assessment as a tool for learning. Studies in Educational Evaluation, 23, (4), p. 279-298.

Ewens, W. (1989).  “Teaching using discussion.” In R. A. Neff & M. Weimer (Eds.), Classroom communication: Collected readings for effective discussion and questioning (pp. 27-30).  Madison, WI: Magna Publications, Inc.

Frederick, P. (1989).  “The dreaded discussion: Ten ways to start.” In R. A. Neff & M. Weimer (Eds.), Classroom communication: Collected readings for effective discussion and questioning (pp. 9-18).  Madison, WI: Magna Publications, Inc.

Goodwin, S. & colleagues.  (1989).  “Planning questions.” In R. A. Neff & M. Weimer (Eds.), Classroom communication: Collected readings for effective discussion and questioning (pp. 91-92).  Madison, WI: Magna Publications, Inc.

Grabe, M. & Grabe, C. (1996). Integrating technology for meaningful learning.  Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.

Gray, S. (1998).  Web‑based instructional tools.  Syllabus, 12. [On‑line].  Available: http://www. syllabus.com/sep98_magfea2.html

Harasim, L., Hiltz, S. R., Teles, L. & Turoff, M. (1995).  Learning networks: A field guide to teaching and learning online.  Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Johnson, D. W., Johnson, R. T., & Smith, K. A. (1998).  Active learning: Cooperation in the college classroom.  Edina, MN: Interaction Book Company.

Jonassen, D. H. (1996).  Computers in the classroom: Mindtools for critical thinking. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Merrill/Prentice‑Hall.

Lage, M. J., Platt, G. J., & Treglia, M. (2000). Inverting the classroom: A gateway to creating an inclusive learning environment. Journal of Economic Education, 31, 30-43.

Najjar, L. (1996). Multimedia information and learning. Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 5, 129‑150.

Neff, R. A. & Weimer, M. (Eds.). (1989).  Classroom communication: Collected readings for effective discussion and questioning.  Madison, WI: Magna Publications, Inc.

Palloff, R. M., & Pratt, K (1999), Building learning communities in cyberspace: Effective strategies for the online classroom. San Francisco: Jossey‑Bass.

Paris, S. & Winograd, P. (1990). How metacognition can promote academic learning and instruction. In B. Jones & L. Idol (Eds.), Dimensions of Thinking and Cognitive Instruction (pp. 15-52). Hillsdale, NJ: Earlbaum.

Reiss, D.  (n.d.).  Tips for Interactive Online Learning.  (list of 11 points)  Available http://waltoncollege.uark.edu/disted/tips_for_interactive_online_lear.htm.  Accessed May 20, 2000.

Sherry, L. (1998).  The Nature and Purpose of Online Discourse: A Brief Synthesis of Current Research as related to The WEB Project.  Article submitted for publication in the International Journal of Educational Telecommunications.  Available http://www.cudenver.edu/~lsherry/pubs/dialogue.htm.  Accessed May 9, 2000.

Thelwall, M. (2000). Computer-based assessment: a versatile educational tool. Computers and Education34, pp. 37-49.

Weigel, V. B. (2002).  Deep learning for a digital ageSan Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Weimer, M. (1989).  “Research summary: Professors part of the problem?” In R. A. Neff & M. Weimer (Eds.), Classroom communication: Collected readings for effective discussion and questioning (pp. 69-71).  Madison, WI: Magna Publications, Inc.
 
The following are a few of the more recent works on the Classroom Flip:
Ladner, B., Beagle, D., Steele, J. R., & Steele, L. (2004). Rethinking online instruction: From cognitive transmission to cognitive immersion. Reference and User Services Quarterly, 43(4), 329.

Strayer, J. F. (2007).  The effects of the Classroom Flip on the learning environment: A comparison of learning activity in a traditional classroom and a Flip classroom that used an intelligent tutoring system.  Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The Ohio State University, Columbus.

Toto, R. & Nguyen, H. (2009).  Flipping the work design in an industrial engineering course.  39th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, October 18-21, 2009, San Antonio, TX (Presentation T4F-1 ISBN: 978-1-4244-4714-5/09).

 
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